Archive for the ‘Audience Targeting’ category

What’s Your Presidential Election Year Beer?

October 19, 2012

What’s your election year beer?

Who would have guessed that the most Democratic drink by a long shot is Cognac, or that such lite beers as Amstel Lite, Michelob Ultra, Miller Lite and Sam Adams Light tilt so far to the political right, while Bud, Miller High Life, and Natural Lite are Democratic?

Groups like No Labels that seek to revive bipartisanship on Capitol Hill would be well advised to serve Bud Light, Guinness, Scotch, Michelob Lite and Coors Original at their fundraisers. This story is an excerpt from a NY Times Blog posted by Thomas B Edsall.

Follow this link for the full story entitled ” Let the Nanotargeting Begin”. The opinions and comments in this blog do not represent the opinions or preferences of Emory Digital or its employees but nano-targeting is big with political ad campaigns and we thought you would enjoy considering the implications of  “what is your presidential election year beer?

Enjoy and Prosper!

Steve Emory, author DM Deja vu

President, Managing Partner Emory Digital

5 Tips When Using Retargeting to Lower Your CPA’s

July 26, 2012

Companies considering or already using display banner advertising demand a measurable ROI to justify display banner media in their budget.  Smart marketers don’t pay as much attention to impressions or click based metrics. The value of banner ads is their contribution to branding, the cost per action (CPA) and the resulting boost in sales.

CPA is unique to your business model and is whatever action yields the most sales and profits for you. An e-commerce or online retail sale CPA is based on a completed form and credit card transaction; an insurance CPA typically is based on a completed contact form or phone call.

When building your banner ad budget, set your maximum allowable CPA based on the average margin you earn per sale and the % of revenue you are willing to spend to acquire a new customer. Consider the lifetime value (in revenue) of a new customer when setting your CPA goal. Then manage your campaign based on your allowable CPA.

Audience targeting is used effectively in display banner ad retargeting campaigns.

With retargeting, your CPA improves dramatically because you are serving ads to previous and recent visitors to your website. This means prospect-visitors that have already shown an interest in your product or service will be exposed during your campaign to more ads when they visit another website that accepts advertising (the majority of some of the most popular websites).

After repeated exposure to banner ads-many will convert at a higher rate, resulting in an improved (lower) CPA. A lower CPA in turn allows you to spend more media dollars and/or improve your profit margins.

5 Tips When Using Retargeting to Lower Your CPA’s

1.  Bid higher for impressions that are likely to convert

Campaign performance data shows that the best keywords, when targeted in the right recency windows, will drive low CPA’s even if bought at higher CPM prices.

So don’t be afraid to bid at a $10.00 CPM or higher on the keywords that drive performance. This will win your campaign more volume on the best performing keywords, and if you are taking advantage of dynamic CPM pricing, you will pay a far lower CPM, often as much as 50%less than your maximum allowed bid.

2.  Consider keywords that don’t perform well in search

Some keywords don’t perform well in paid search because they are too expensive in search, too competitive, have low quality scores or other reasons. These same keywords, when targeted on banner impressions with the right characteristics, may be able to deliver favorable CPA’s in retargeting.

3.  Use audience targeting

Audience targeting including the use of external third party data and look-a-like modeling which identifies prospects with search patterns of existing converters on the advertiser’s site. By using this technology, additional keywords can be discovered and tested.

For example, Medicare consumers also tend to be searching for terms related to insurance. Insurance terms can be added to the campaign and tested for their ability to drive lower CPA’s.

4.  Ignore click through rate & cost per click

If your goal is a low CPA, don’t confuse matters by simultaneously trying to optimize to a high CTR or CPC. Likewise, don’t restrict your campaign to only the sites that can be won at very low CPM bids.

5.  Pay attention to recency

In search retargeting, the optimal time window between when the user performs the search and when the user is shown your ad can vary greatly by campaign and by vertical.

For example, verticals like restaurants have a short consideration cycle for reservations, and the optimum recency is often measured in minutes or hours.

For verticals like financial services, there is a longer consideration cycle and a 30-day recency window may drive the best results. Each campaign has its own optimum recency window, and understanding this will drive improved CPA.

Enjoy and Prosper!

Steve Emory, co-author DM Deja vu

President, Managing Partner Emory Digital

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Attention Marketers-Don’t Overlook Older Adults’ Internet Use

July 2, 2012

This post is for online marketers thinking about how to sell more to younger consumers who represent the majority of online users for their products or services.

Do so at your own risk but don’t ignore the surge of older adults with typically more disposable income and a lot more time on their hands to surf the web for just about everything.  Apple‘s i-pad is a big hit in nursing homes, age 60 is becoming the new 30 in consumerism and more consumers turning 65 and their caregivers are turning to the Web to find and compare Medicare plans.

Seniors are Internet Users too

According to Pew Research, as of April 2012, 53% of American adults age 65 and older use the internet or email. Though these adults are still less likely than all other age groups to use the internet, the latest data represent the first time that half of seniors are going online. After several years of very little growth among this group, these gains are significant.

As of February 2012, one third (34%) of internet users age 65 and older use social networking sites such as Facebook, and 18% do so on a typical day. By comparison, email use continues to be the bedrock of online communications for seniors. As of August 2011, 86% of internet users age 65 and older use email, with 48% doing so on a typical day.

Read the complete story here: Older adults and internet use | Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project.

If you have any questions or need help with this topic, contact me at emorydigitalmarketing.

Steve Emory, President, Managing Partner Emory Digital

Is This the End of the Movie Theater?

May 26, 2012

On Monday, May 20, 2012 a Chinese conglomerate announced it will buy major U.S. cinema chain, AMC Entertainment Holdings, for $2.6 billion in China’s biggest takeover of an American company to date. Dalian Wanda Group Co.’s purchase will create the world’s biggest movie theater operator. The Beijing-based company said it will invest an additional $500 million to fund AMC’s development. AMC operates 346 cinemas, mostly in the United States and Canada, and says it has 23 of the 50 highest-grossing U.S. outlets.

 “We support AMC becoming bigger, not only in the United States but in the global market,” said Wanda chairman Wang Jianlin at a signing ceremony for the acquisition. Wanda said AMC’s American management will remain in place and the headquarters will stay in the Kansas City area. It said staff numbers were not expected to be affected. The company employs some 18,500 people. AMC has reported losses for the past three years.

Back in 1959, Mary Pickford, who was a Hollywood star and also cofounded studio giant United Artists and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science), claimed that cable TV would kill theaters. Then, of course, Jack Valenti famously said the VCR would be the “Boston strangler” to the movie business.

Yet, now, with home theaters, video on demand, streaming services and infringement, the theaters are once again insisting that this time theaters are really in trouble.

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So You Want To Open a Restaurant

May 16, 2012

How many times have you heard a family member or friend tell you they secretly wanted to own their own restaurant?

It may seem glamorous to those on the outside, but those in the know realize that it’s not. You will require an all-consuming passion for the restaurant and the patience of a saint. You will be open six or seven days a week. You will definitely start earlier than you thought and have later nights than you bargained for. It is relentless day in and day out with no sign of a break.

The strongest advice I can give is to work in a restaurant before you buy one. The most successful owners have waited tables, tended bar, worked in the kitchen and managed front of house and operations before investing.

Chances of Success

Restaurants fail at a 57 to 61 percent rate with the highest failure rate of 26 percent during the first year, 19 percent in year 2 and 14 percent in the third year. According to H.G Parsa, author of a study on restaurant failures and associate professor of hospitality management at Ohio State many restaurants close not because they couldn’t succeed financially, but because of personal reasons involving the owner(s) such as divorce, poor health or simply a desire to retire. “The successful owners were either very good at balancing their family and work lives or single or divorced.” (more…)

We want to talk. How should we contact you?

May 5, 2012

Once upon a time you were able to reach your customers and targeted prospects with direct mail, newspaper ads, outbound phone calls, email blasts and even enhanced yellow page listings.

If you are using the same channels to reach your audience that you employed ten years ago, you are finding it more and more difficult to deliver the same message.

While targeted and personalized messages in the mail can still be effective, response rates to offers are down 30% to 40%. Newspaper advertising, as I documented in a previous blog is 40% less effective than it was in the 80’s and 90’s and just as costly. And of course, telemarketing took a 50% hit in usefulness with the advent of the do not call list. In the last decade, the phone book has gotten smaller and smaller and barely qualifies as a decent kids booster chair anymore. The most important thing to know about email is that large generically addressed blasts don’t work anymore either. To maintain any effective return your email messages need to have a very targeted single message and be personalized for each individual.

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Fire A Client Today!

May 1, 2012

I took me a good ten years in business to muster the courage to fire my first client.

Since I am not Donald Trump, my early reluctance was based on a modest bank account, coupled with the lack of confidence that I would be able to replace them with a better client.

I am quite sure if you examine your customer list you can identify a few who are exceptionally demanding of your time, are very slow to pay for your service, who undervalue your contribution and are constantly looking for a discount. I have found that 10% of my worst clients (call them the bottom feeders) take up to 50% of my time and provide me with less than 2% of my professional satisfaction or sense of accomplishment.

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